Michael Banu :) (m_banu) wrote in taoists,
Michael Banu :)
m_banu
taoists

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Whee!

Daodejing doesn't translate into "The Way of Virtue", you know.

Te means "virtue" as in the way something expresses itself. Like the Te of a rock is that it is hard. It being hard is "by virtue of" it being a rock.

And Tao means "the way" as in an abbreviation for "The Way Things Are".

A better translation for Daodejing than "The Way of Virtue", I think, would be "The Way Things Are, and Its Consequences". :P
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Have to voice a different opinion. Although I don`t know Chinese, I know Japanese (language and script), and I think one has to be a bit careful applying common English sayings to Chinese.

Tao is usually written as the character for road or path. The `path things are` would make no sense, where the `path to/of virtue` does.

Of course you`re free to disagree. Maybe you have the formal training in Chinese that I lack. But I am always a bit cautious about translating very freely, especially if the interpretations of most scholars seem to differ.

Where did you find Tao is an abbreviation of `the way things are?` Why can`t it be like the do of Japanese words like shōdō (the writing way, i.e. calligraphy), judō (the gentle way), chadō (the way/art of tea) etc? (Which is all written with that same character as it was imported by the Japanese from the Chinese).

Of course you can now say that I can`t apply Japanese etymology to a Chinese word, and while that is correct, comparing the two may give us a hint about what to believe.

I could always ask a few Sinologists I know about their opinion on the matter, if you like.
good points; I've always seen the title as 'Tao, Te'. The most common translation of te is virtue, but the book i have outlines a concept that as a holy principle, Te can be viewed as the perfect expression of Tao. We can't describe Tao, but we can perceive Te, and in so doing gain a glimpse of a facet of Tao. Perhaps it is not 'the way of virtue', but rather 'the Way (which cannot be followed), and the way-to-follow-it (virtue, Te)'.

Or maybe I'm just not getting it; lol. I've just recently (finally) picked up a good copy of the Tao Te Ching.

Interestingly enough, a lot of translations i have seen put the section of Virtue before the section of the Way; I can't remember what verse the division is at, does anyone have one of those copies?

-t.
IS ANYONE RESPONDING IN THIS COMMUNITY? IT HAS BEEN QUITE A TIME SINCE AN ENTRY.

I HAVE INPUT ON TAO AND TE, DIRECTLY FROM THE TEXTS OF LAO TZU.